Annotated Bibliography Page Numbers Apa 6th

1. The heading with your name and class information appears on the first page only.  Subsequent pages contain a header with your surname and the page number.

2. Give the annotated bibliography a title that identifies the common topic(s) that all the sources share.  Note that you do not need to nor should you label this "Annotated Bibliography" since it's obvious from looking at the page that it is, in fact, an annotated bibliography.

3. Sources appear in alphabetical order by author surname or title.  Note well that each entry begins with an MLA-style works cited citation.  Check the format information above for more details.

4.  Annotations vary in length depending on the complexity of the source; however, annotations of even the longest sources are brief, as in the Bradford example.  Check the content information above for more details about what to include in your annotations.

5.  Note the "inverse paragraph" format:  The first line of each entry is flush left while subsequent lines are indented 1 to 1.5 inches.  The right margin is not justified.  The entire document is double spaced from the title to the last line.

Download a PDF version of the sample.

The following example uses the APA format for the journal citation.

Waite, L. J., Goldschneider, F. K., & Witsberger, C. (1986). Nonfamily living and the erosion of traditional family orientations among young adults. American Sociological Review,51, 541-554.

The authors, researchers at the Rand Corporation and Brown University, use data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Women and Young Men to test their hypothesis that nonfamily living by young adults alters their attitudes, values, plans, and expectations, moving them away from their belief in traditional sex roles. They find their hypothesis strongly supported in young females, while the effects were fewer in studies of young males. Increasing the time away from parents before marrying increased individualism, self-sufficiency, and changes in attitudes about families. In contrast, an earlier study by Williams cited below shows no significant gender differences in sex role attitudes as a result of nonfamily living.

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