Essay About Jazz Age

The Jazz Age Essay

“Music touches us emotionally, where words alone can't.”(Depp) In the Twenties in America music did just that. The power of music goes far beyond our imagination. In the 1920’s, commonly known as the Jazz Age, music touched a generation and was the driving force for a new social revolution. Jazz music changed the way music was played and listened too. Jazz is known as a style of music that is free from rules. This Idea of being “free for rules” was not only applied to music but also to the people’s lifestyles, especially the youth. Being free from rules appealed to the youth of America in the 20’s because many have grown tired of the traditional lifestyle and conventions of previous generations. The jazz age was a time for youth to set themselves free and in doing so they shocked the older generations. Jazz music was a phenomenon that once it hit America, America would never be the same. The jazz age forever changed lifestyles of young men and women by introducing Jazz, which changed the way Americans played and listened to music, and got rid of the old social convention of the previous generations.
Jazz is a style of music that has been around for a while. It was first played in New Orleans around the end of the 19th century but its influences eventually spread through the entire world. Jazz finds its roots in other styles of music like ragtime, blues, and brass band music, but jazz is very unique. One of the most prominent characteristics of jazz is improvisation. Improvisation is the spontaneous creation of new, fresh melodies usually over a set chord progression. With Improvisation, the musician has more freedom to express himself how he wishes. Live jazz is always a fresh and unique experience because you never know what to expect.
One of the most important people to make a contribution to jazz was Ferdinand “Jelly Roll” Morton. It is said that he was “the first great composer and piano player of Jazz.” Jelly roll Morton even claimed to be the inventor of jazz in 1902 and there is evidence that supports his claim. Still whether his claim to true or not is still up for debate. One thing that is sure is that Jelly Roll Morton was an excellent pianist and a key figure in the transition between ragtime and jazz. In 1926 Jelly Roll Morton form the jazz band the Red Hot Peppers. The band was very successful and they recorded many songs such as: “Black Bottom Stomp”, “Smoke-House Blues”, and “Doctor Jazz”. (“Jelly Roll Morton”)
One of the most world famous jazz musicians ever in America was Louis Armstrong. Louis Armstrong was born on august 4, 1901 in New Orleans, Louisiana. After becoming popular in the 1920’s, Armstrong’s name would always be synonymous with the jazz genre. He amazed people with his technic on the trumpet and cornet and by his unique gravelly voice. Armstrong’s talent led him to play in many different bands and record many songs. One of his most famous pieces from the jazz age was...

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The Jazz Age Essay

1472 Words6 Pages

The era of the Roaring Twenties, was a time of great societal change. Many of these changes were greatly influenced by jazz music. During this time, the country was coming out of World War I and the attitude of most people was dark and dismal. Dance and music clubs became tremendously popular in an effort to improve the quality of life for many people.
After experiencing the death and destruction caused by World War I, young men and women were ready for a change. They wanted to forget about misery of wartime and instead, focus on enjoying themselves as much as possible. The youth of this time wanted to rebel against the restrictive pre-war attitudes of their parents and society. In an effort to challenge tradition, they exhibited…show more content…

Advancements in technology also facilitated the spread of jazz music into mainstream society. Modern appliances allowed for people to have more free time. They filled this free time with entertainment. More disposable income also allowed for the purchase of phonograph records which brought jazz to areas where no bands performed. The radio was also important to the dissemination of jazz. Unlike many clubs, which were still segregated, radio was not. While many African American station owners struggled to survive in a white society they eventually managed to bring jazz music into the homes of both white and black households (Burns). Jazz music gave rise to several subcultures during the 1920’s. One of the most well-known being the flapper. The flapper represented the changing role of women in the post war society. Women during this time wanted greater independence. They entered the workforce in an attempt to break away from parental authority and establish a personal identity (American Republic). Many women began to pursue educations and were able to make significant contributions in the fields of science and law. Often represented as shallow and not very smart, flappers were usually well educated young women who only wanted to break free from the restraints of a Victorian minded society. The trademarks of a flapper

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